Talks & Tours

Artist Talk: Dore Ashton + Bill Tucker

WHEN
Saturday, Apr 16, 2011


WHERE
Benenson Center
COST

Free!

Dore Ashton (b. 1929 - d. 2017) was an eminent writer and critic of contemporary art. She is the author of numerous books on art and culture, including A Fable of Modern Art, which she considers to be her best work, and The New York School: A Cultural Reckoning. She has written many monographs on individual artists including Philip Guston, Mark Rothko, and Isamu Noguchi. She is Professor of Art History at the Cooper Union, New York, and Visiting Professor of Art History at Yale University. Ashton met William Tucker early in his career, when she visited his studio in London, and has written about his work over the course of his career and their long friendship.

William Tucker (b. 1935) is a distinguished sculptor who works in a wide variety of materials, from steel and recycled wood, to cast pieces in bronze, plaster and concrete. Asked to describe his work, Ashton commented that Tucker has found “original ways to extend the great modern tradition in sculpture.” Born in Cairo in 1935, Tucker moved to London as a young child. He attended the University of Oxford from 1955 to 1958 and continued postgraduate study at the Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London, where Anthony Caro was teaching.

His work came to public prominence in 1965 when it was exhibited in The New Generation exhibition at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London. The following year he exhibited alongside Caro in the important 1966 exhibition, Primary Structures, at the Jewish Museum in New York. Tucker was Gregory Fellow at the Fine Arts Department of the University of Leeds for two years from 1968 to 1970, and represented Britain at the 1972 Venice Biennale. In 1978 Tucker moved to New York, where he taught at Columbia University and the New York Studio School. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1981, the National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in 1986, and in 2010, the International Sculpture Center’s award for Lifetime Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture. Tucker’s work has been exhibited in The Fields Sculpture Park.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited.

Park Map

Related Exhibition

More Events

Every Saturday
10 AM – 12 PM

Saturday Children's Workshops

Every Saturday
10 AM – 12 PM
Benenson Center

Join us on Saturday mornings for safe exploration of the Sculpture & Architecture Park and art-making for kids ages 5-12. Weekly workshops host a maximum of twelve children, with a minimum of two teachers. This program will be held almost entirely outdoors with art-making occurring under the open-air Education Pavilions.

Every Monday, Wednesday
5 – 7:30 PM

Open Figure Drawing for Adults

Every Monday, Wednesday
5 – 7:30 PM
Newmark Gallery

Open Figure Drawing for Adults gathers Monday and Wednesday evenings to sketch, draw, and render from a live model. Open to artists of all skill levels ages 16+, each two-hour sessions is self-guided and intended to provide time and space for members of our local community to share in the exploration of this traditional art practice. Please note that pre-registration is required.

Every Tuesday
3:30 – 5:30 PM

Pagemasters with Grace Lang

Every Tuesday
3:30 – 5:30 PM
Benenson Center

What can we do when one page isn’t enough for a work of art? How do we define book art and what possibilities does this creative process present? This class will focus on creating one-of-a-kind artist books. Students will have a chance to create one or multiple books using collected mementos such as ticket stubs, hand-written notes, scraps of wrapping paper or old photographs as well as original works on paper. They will be introduced to simple bookbinding techniques and different book forms. We will consider the importance of page sequence and how pairing certain works together can alter how we experience the individual pieces. Students will repurpose old drawings and collages and use text, images, and patterns from vintage magazines to create new artworks, poems, and stories. Students will see how a seemingly random collection of papers can come together to tell a personal story. There are no limits as to what students can create! Materials will be provided, but students are also encouraged to collect materials they would like to include.

Explore Further